Win Tickets to Iron Maiden

Win Tickets to Iron Maiden

Play Picozzi’s 30 Second 6 Song Challenge at 7:30a this week and win tickets to see Iron Maiden at the Xfinity Theater on Aug 3

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It was about a girl

It was about a girl

The Doors released L-A Woman, their sixth and final album with Jim Morrison, on April 19th, 1971.  “Love Her Madly” was the one song Robby Krieger actually wrote about someone in particular. It was on the album: L.A. Woman in 1971 and peaked at number-11 on the Billboard Hot 100. “Love Her Madly” was the first single released from L.A. Woman, The Doors’ final album with Jim Morrison. In a 1980s interview, guitarist Robby Krieger spoke about writing and recording it.

“My songs are not about anybody in particular usually, except for ‘Love Her Madly’ I wrote about my girlfriend, who became my wife. That was the first one, I think, that I used acoustic 12-string on, and Jerry Scheff was the bass player on that one. He had a great bass line.”

Way, Way Back

Way, Way Back

Rush were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame six years ago today (April 18th). The song “Working Man” goes way, way back. It’s on the album titled Rush in 1974 but it goes back further.  It was not released as a single, but a fan and rock radio favorite throughout the band’s entire career. Geddy Lee says he and Alex Lifeson wrote “Working Man” while still in their teens.

”I think we were out of high school, but it was a long, long time ago. [We] definitely played it around the bars for many years before it ever got recorded. It was a favorite in the pubs and it wasn’t really until the record got released that we realized what a favorite it was becoming, because for some reason that song just connected. Even today, people come up to me and want to hear that song and they love that song. And it was probably the song that did the most to break us in the United States, the way it connected. And when it did get on the radio, it had a lot of impact.”

What the Hell Does that Song Mean

What the Hell Does that Song Mean

The Band played their first solo show — after serving as Bob Dylan’s band — 50 years ago today (April 17th) at Winterland in San Francisco. The song “The Weight” has been recorded by many. It was on the album: Music From Big Pink in 1968. Robbie Robertson got the writing credit, but Levon Helm claimed the entire group contributed. Although it only peaked at number-63 on the Billboard Hot 100, it spawned numerous cover versions. Aretha Franklin’s, with Duane Allman on guitar, was the most successful, reaching number-19 pop and number-three on the soul chart. It was also recorded by Jackie DeShannon, The Supremes and The Temptations and The Staples Singers. Robbie Robertson says that he was surprised at all the versions of “The Weight.”

“Much to my surprise, a lot of people connected to the song that I would have never imagined. All these people were recording this song, like one after the other. It seemed like every week they were sending me a new cover of this song. And I thought, ‘This is completely baffling that people would relate to it in this way.’ And the only person that ever said to me, ‘What the hell does this song mean?’ was Pops Staples.”

They wanted to

They wanted to

“Lonesome Dave” Peverett was born 69 years ago today (April 16th). (Dave Edmunds, who produced the studio version of “I Just Want to Make Love to You,” turned 75 yesterday.) The song was a Willie Dixon song and they had played it once in a previous band and thought it was a good song to do. The late Dave Peverett in a 1990 interview explained how Foghat came to record the Willie Dixon song “I Just Want to Make Love to You.” He said he regularly listened to a Best of Muddy Waters compilation growing up, and that song was a favorite of his.

“When we were still with Savoy Brown, we ran out of encores one night and we were jamming. I threw that song in and w we jammed around it. And then when we formed Foghat we kept that in mind as being a good song to do. Dave Edmunds produced the original record and got a great feel, great sound, a little bit of distortion, which doesn’t hurt sometimes. It’s a great song to do, lyrically. Like most Willie Dixon songs, they’re very simple, but very effective.”

Photo Credit: Landmark / PR Photos

Couldn’t He Afford the Airfare?

Couldn’t He Afford the Airfare?

Alan Parsons known for engineering and production on Abby Road, Let it Be, Dark Side of the Moon and his own Alan Parson’s Project has a new solo album coming out April 26th. Original Foreigner singer Lou Gramm is featured on. He sings the song “Sometimes.” But he didn’t travel to Santa Barbara where Alan was.. Here is Alan parsons:

“We did it at a distance. He was in New York, I was at my studio in Santa Barbara. But the Internet makes these things possible these days to actually record pretty much live at a distance like that. [It’s] always nice to have the personal contact, but when the guy’s actually singing it’s a personal thing. You are treating the microphone as the world and that can be kind of anywhere anyplace.”

Win Tickets to The Australian Pink Floyd Show

Win Tickets to The Australian Pink Floyd Show

This week during the 10@10 listen for your chance to win tickets to see The Australian Pink Floyd Show on Friday, August 23rd at Toyota Oakdale Theatre

Tickets on sale Friday April 19 at 10am at the Oakdale.

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Wrong again

Wrong again

Steppenwolf singer John Kay celebrates his 75th birthday today (April 12th). The song “Born to Be Wild” was huge, it peaked at number-two on the Billboard Hot 100. But at first the record company didn’t think it was a hit and didn’t want it as an A-side — but the band pushed for it. Steppenwolf singer John Kay says their record company didn’t hear it.

“It was the third single released off the album, and the record company didn’t think it was a hit. So they said, ‘You can put that on the B-side, but this other tune here is the hit.’ Everybody was yelling and screaming and finally a compromise was reached. ‘Let’s put the songs back-to-back. We will not designate either side as being either A or B. We’ll put it out and we will let radio decide what they want to play.’ Within a couple of weeks, ‘Born to Be Wild’ was the one that 9 out of 10 stations went on.”

it was a Willie Bobo song

it was a Willie Bobo song

Even a jam band needs songs. The Santana song “Evil Ways” was not written by the band. It was on their first album titled Santana in 1969.  Believe it or not before that Santana was a jam band. Evil Ways was the band’s first Top 10 hit; it peaked at number-nine on the Billboard Hot 100. It was the title track of a 1968 album by Afro-Cuban jazz percussionist Willie Bobo and suggested by Fillmore West promoter Bill Graham. Carlos Santana explains how the song came to his attention not long after it was released.

“Bill Graham. He’s the one that brought it in. He brought a lot of songs for us to do. We were just like a jam band, we didn’t have no endings, no beginnings, no middles [laughs]. We didn’t know anything about choruses or bridge. Y’know, we just jammed. And he said, ‘Well, you know, that’s pretty good, but you guys need some songs.’ So he brought ‘Evil Ways’ in.”

Inspirational Dream

Inspirational Dream

It came to him in a dream. The Beatles song “Let It Be” was written because Paul’s late mother, Mary, came to him in a dream and he was inspired to write a song. It was on the album of the same name and it spent two weeks at number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1970 Paul McCartney explains that he wrote “Let It Be” at about the time The Beatles had begun the contentious recording sessions for the album of the same title. It was literally inspired by seeing his late mother, Mary Patricia Mullen McCartney, in that dream.

“We were all getting a little crazy, and I’d gone to bed one night well crazy and had a dream. And she’d been in the dream, which is always lovely, you know, when people who’ve been long gone come in dreams, ‘cause you actually meet them again, even if it’s just within the confines of your own head. And she said, ‘You’ll be alright.’ She was very sort of calming and I woke up thinking, ‘I feel better about things.’ As I usually did, I started writing a song. And because she was my mother and her name was Mary, I said, ‘Mother Mary comes to me.’”