For a Guitar?!

For a Guitar?!

It was on this day in 1999 — June 24th — that Eric Clapton auctioned off more than 100 if his guitars at Sotheby’s in New York, raising more than $5-million for his Crossroads rehabilitation center in Antigua. The top seller was his 1956 Fender Stratocaster, nicknamed Brownie, which sold $450,000, the highest price ever paid for a single guitar.

Since then, Clapton has held two more guitar auctions, with included two more iconic guitars — Blackie, which set the record in 2004 when it sold for $959,000, and his Gibson ES 355, which sold for $847,000. But while Clapton parted with many of his cherished six strings, it just drove him to buy more.

Eric Clapton on replacing some of the guitars he auctioned off.

“What I’ve done is replaced them actually. You know for instance, that guitar, the red Gibson, the Cream guitar, the people that bought that was the Guitar Center, and they said, when I was in L.A., they said, ‘Well, you know, you want to see some vintage guitars?’ I found an ES 335 sunburst that was even better. I mean very expensive and I bought it and actually come out of that, in terms of a quality instrument, better off. Not much better, but I’ve replaced it. I’ll always collect and I’ll always clean house.”

Eric Clapton on what he thought when asked to auction off 100 of his guitars in 1999.

“Well I knew that I had more than I needed. Let’s put it like that. I had a problem with the fact that I couldn’t play them all [and] they were just gathering dust in a warehouse. So my initial reaction was, ‘What a great idea’ because the idea of being able to kind of move these and take that guilt off of myself, and also make money and raise awareness for a cause that I really believe in.”

Photo Credit: Landmark / Photorazzi

Meet Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Drive Kyle Larson at Foxwood Resort Casino

Meet Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Drive Kyle Larson at Foxwood Resort Casino

Listen to Klonk’s 10@10 Monday- Wednesday and win a pair of Meet and Greet passes to meet NASCAR’s Kyle Larson and watch him race at the Karting for Kids event!

 

Speedway Children’s Charities New-Hampshire Chapter is excited to host the Karting For Kids indoor karting championship, where you can go wheel-to-wheel against other NASCAR fans for a chance to race against Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series driver Kyle Larson!

Tickets:

$100/competitor (16 & older) includes one qualifying race with the chance to race in the finals against Kyle Larson, team picture with Kyle Larson, a private Q&A session with Kyle Larson, team t-shirt & a catered lunch. $25/spectator includes access to watch the qualifying and final races, a private Q&A session with Kyle Larson & a catered lunch.

If you plan to participate you must register ahead of time.

*Must be 16 years or older to participant in this event

The event will be held at:
MONZA World Class Karting
Foxwoods Resort Casino
350 Trolley Line Blvd
Mashantucket, CT 06338

For more information, contact Hillarie Scott at (603) 513-5738 or HScott@NHMS.com

Medical Mick

Medical Mick

Three months after it was originally scheduled, The Rolling Stones will begin the U.S. leg of the No Filter tour with the first of two shows tonight (Friday) at Soldier Field in Chicago. The tour was postponed when Mick Jagger underwent heart valve replacement surgery in April. Radar Online reports that precautions are in place to ensure his safety on the road. A source told the site, “They have three doctors on eight-hour rotations. Mick wears a monitor while performing and keeps a defibrillator nearby. They have emergency routes planned from every hotel and venue to the closest hospital.” As usual, many are wondering if this will be the band’s last go-round.

Mick Jagger on being asked if their next tour was The Rolling Stones’ last one.

“They started asking the question, ‘Is this gonna be your last tour?’ in 1966. I distinctly remember that. I always dated that from there. You know, I’m not the Oracle of Delphi and they’re [the press] not the three graces. So I don’t know — definitely not in my mind anyway.”

Ronnie Wood says the goal of the tour is to spread “pleasure.”

“I do believe that it gives people hope, you know, the music that we put out, and it just takes them into a little surreal world again for a bit and take all their troubles away in the light of what’s going down. Yeah, we just want to spread some smiles and get some serious grooves interacting with the audience.”

Who is the “Magic Man”

Who is the “Magic Man”

Who is Heart’s “Magic Man”  Thousands wanted to be the magic man, it was actually inspired by the guy Ann Wilson was with when the song was written. The song came out in 1976 on the album Dreamboat Annie. The first single from Heart’s debut album flopped, but the follow-up, “Magic Man,” reached number-nine on the Billboard Hot 100. Who was the real magic man? In a 1980s interview Ann Wilson explained:

“There are so many magic men all over the country, it’s really amazing. Like, onstage, whenever we do that song, this line of guys pushes up to the very front and points at themselves like, ‘Me, me, I’m the magic man! Me!’ So there probably are about 30,000 of them across the country. But the original magic man was the man I was with at the time the song was written, who was indeed a magical person.”

Ok she didn’t really say but I will, it was Mike Fisher.  He was the original guitarist for heart and when he went to Canada to avoid getting drafted to Viet nam she followed him.  He returned to manage the band.

An album of another band that wasn’t them but was them

An album of another band that wasn’t them but was them

Sir Paul McCartney celebrates his 77th birthday today (June 18th). The Beatles: “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” was designed to be some other band is playing this song. But really it would be them. The song wasn’t released as a single, but the album it kicked off and shared its name with topped the Billboard 200 for 15 weeks and was the best-selling album of the 1960s. Looking to do something as totally mind-blowing as The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds, Paul McCartney came up with a concept that would, as he put it, “lend distance to the album.” He tells how the title track of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band originated.

”Basically, from this idea I had about this band. It was going to be an album of another band that wasn’t us. And just imagine all the time that it wasn’t us playing this album. So I had this song written of Sergeant Pepper and it was twenty years ago and he taught us to play and we’re his proteges and here we are.”

Photo Credit: Landmark/PR Photos

Oye Vay

Oye Vay

Original Santana singer and keyboardist Gregg Rolie celebrates his 72nd birthday today (June 17th). The Santana song “Oye Como Va” from the album Abraxas in 1970 surprised the band. Gregg Rolie recalls that the non-Latino members of Santana were taken aback at the idea of covering “Oye Como Va.”. He recalls that he had to learn to sing “Oye Como Va” phonetically. Unlike most of the band members, he and drummer Mike Shrieve didn’t speak Spanish. Rolie remembers the song — whose title translates as “Hear how it goes” — as sounding very different than anything the band had previously attempted.

“The original, done by Tito Puente, when these guys — Carlos and Carabello and Chepito — brought this song in, ‘Man, listen to this.’ Mike and I are looking at each other like, ‘You’ve got to be kidding. You want to play this?’ I mean, it was real Latin. ‘Well, OK, we’ll try.’ And we did it and it was totally different from anything I had a scope on wanting to play, but we got into it and it’s fun to play.”

Photo Credit: PRN/PRPhotos.com

It wasn’t a song…yet

It wasn’t a song…yet

Alan White, who replaced Bill Bruford as the drummer in Yes in 1972, turns 70 today (June 14th). Bruford, by the way, turned 70 last month. The Yes song “Owner of a Lonely Heart” which ended up on the album 90125 in 1983 was only half done when Jon Anderson came into the picture. He says it was a beautifully produced track that wasn’t really a song. He wasn’t involved in the first stages of “Owner of a Lonely Heart” — guitarist Trevor Rabin had the idea for the song. Anderson tells what happened next.

“I came in when the song was halfway through and the production was really amazing already. What was sort of missing was the song, so me and Trevor got together one afternoon and wrote. The kind of lyric that I usually get into is ‘improve yourself’ or ‘move yourself’ or ‘get yourself together, c’mon, wake up’ which is just me saying it to me really, so I’m singing it to myself. The idea of the owner of a lonely heart really was Trevor. He was just a lonely guy.”

He obviously passed the audition

He obviously passed the audition

Mick Taylor was named to replace Brian Jones in The Rolling Stones 50 years ago today (June 13th). The Rolling Stones: “Honky Tonk Women” was the song he played on for his “audition”.  He thought he was brought in to do some overdubs because Brian Jones couldn’t make the session. It turned out to be his audition to join the band.  Initially released as a single in 1969, it was then included on the compilation Through the Past Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2). Taylor recalls what happened just a few weeks earlier, when he was called into the studio with them to do guitar overdubs on “Honky Tonk Women.”

“Once I actually arrived at the studio, I was introduced to them and saw what the set up was, and after they asked me what to do, I realized it was like an audition to join the group, although I went to the studio on the assumption that they needed a guitar player to do some sessions because Brian Jones couldn’t make it.”

This time’s a charm?

This time’s a charm?

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s complete Woodstock performance will go on sale this summer. The hour-long set began just after midnight on August 17th, 1969 and includes “Proud Mary,” “Bad Moon Rising” and “Green River.” Creedence took the stage later than planned, following The Grateful Dead, who ran long. CCR declined to be included in the Woodstock documentary, which created the impression that, despite being top-billed at the festival, they weren’t at Woodstock.

CCR’s Stu Cook on what Woodstock was and wasn’t..

“Woodstock was a landmark, as it turned out, but not because of the bands. The bands were the ticket draw; Creedence was, I think, the first, maybe… the first or second, but I believe the first band, major band to sign with Michael Lang and his partners to participate in the event. Everybody knows what happened, it rained and the gates went down and the number of people doubled — up to near a half-million. But the real story is the audience.”

CCR’s Stu Cook on the Woodstock crowds and the subsequent movie — which will be re-released during 2019.

“How the events unfolded, how people kept it together, is the real story of Woodstock. That’s why I don’t consider it one of my professional… it was nice to have been there and then part of it. It’s a shame we weren’t in the film. We’ve been included in several subsequent anniversary releases. And there’s a good chance that our entire performance will be made available this year. I think they’re just ironing out some of the lawyer stuff right now.”